Books Read In July

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I am reading a lot of Catholic Theology / Material at the moment. This was the first I picked up. An interesting and basic defense of catholic theology and practice from the scriptures. This gives you a good basics in catholic belief.

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This is Tom Rachman’s first novel. And it’s quite a debut! Set around the lives of those who work for an International Newspaper based in Rome, Italy, every other chapter tackles the life of one of the main characters. The other chapters tell the story of how the newspaper begin back in the 60’s. Rachman’s characters are complex and largely very well written. Each character faces challenges, issues, problems in their personal and professional life – issues and problems which are not resolved. The writing is good and fun. Towards the end of the book I was a little jaded. You had just got into a character when the chapter ends and a new one begins. The final chapter does draw the pieces together somewhat with a ‘what happened to them..’ outline. Overall this was a great vacation read.

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A great book – read my  review HERE

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Semi biographical / examination of the contemplative pilgrimage. The book revolves around a sabbatical she and her husband took which involved a pilgrimage through Spain on the Camino, walking 20 miles a day. Read larger review HERE

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Meyers book is filled with valuable advice for ministers to find the brakes of their train and regain perspective, perspective about God and the real things of ministry. Recommended.

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This is also an important book. The study of Christian Spirituality in Church History in one volume is a great resource. Tracing the various forms and practices of spiritual life in the major epochs of the Christian Church is eye opening

Water From A Deep Well: Christian Spirituality From Early Martyrs To Modern Missionaries by Gerald L. Sittser

Quite simply this was a surprisingly wonderful book to read. Gerald Sittser makes history come alive with his engaging style and  flowing style. They say that you must understand something profoundly in order to explain it simply. This is true for Sittser. His scholarship is impressive but his scholarship does not make this book hard to read.

This is also an important book. The study of Christian Spirituality in Church History in one volume is a great resource. Tracing the various forms and practices of spiritual life in the major epochs of the Christian Church is eye opening – not just in how spirituality develops but in both the differences AND the similarites.  Sittser is broad and fair in his study covering a large  spectrum of traditions and theologies. Sittser does not focus on the differences, or the problems – he acknowledges that there are many problems between the various denominations. Instead he has focused on the positives  and that is a good thing. The subject matter of this book is important and now, with this volume, it is available in the form of an excellent book. I have a shelf of books which I try and read each year. This book is going on that self. It will also be in the top 3 books i will recommend for Church History reading. Highly recommended.

Whole Life Transformation: Becoming The Change Your Church Needs by Keith Meyer

At the beginning of chapter 5, Keith Meyer writes As a young minister I found ministry to be an exciting ride. The pace of ministry is really fast, and before I knew it I had forgotten how to stop. (Actually, I had never learned to stop in the first place.) As a minister this one sentence was literally like a sharp blow. Why? Because I realized that in the process of training young ministers, we almost never teach them how to stop. And that is wrong. This book teaches ministers how to stop – not just in order to rest, but in order to be transformed, transformed in order to do ministry differently.

The need for ministers to stop the increasing speeding train of ‘the demands of ministry’ is being acknowledged. The problem is most ministers on this train cannot find the brakes. And usually, it’s only when the train crashes that things change and that is often painful. Keith Meyers train does not crash but it came close. He realized that his ministry was effecting his family in a negative way. He recalls the day this changed for him. Sitting in front of the TV watching cartoons with his young son, he is asked the question, Dad are you home yet? I think most ministers have had this feeling, this revelation – that they have fallen in love with Church, not just Christ.

Meyers book is filled with valuable advice for ministers to find the brakes of their train and regain perspective, perspective about God and the real things of ministry. Recommended.

Even More Books For Sale

Again, the books below are $5.00 each unless otherwise indicated – all very good condition – like new!

More Books For Sale

All the books below are $5.00 unless otherwise indicated. All are in very good condition and have been read only once – no markings in the book.

Book Sale

Over the coming months I am going to post some books which are for sale. I confess that I am posting for the benefit of those in South Carolina – I do not intend posting books, because of the cost. However if you are in South Carolina Diocese and want to collect some books then let me know. Also, come by the office and browse!!

Here are the first batch for sale:

Post-Reformation Reformed Dogmatics: The Rise and Development of Reformed Orthodoxy, ca. 1520 to ca. 1725 (4 vols.) – Peter Muller – read once, no markings, like new – $70

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Reformed Dogmatics – 4 vols – Herman Bavnick – Like new $70

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Systematic Theology – 4 vols – Norman Geisler – like new – $70

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Institutes of Elenctic Theology 3 vol. set – Francis Turretin – new – $65

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John Frame Trilogy – $45

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The Fundamentals – 2 vols -$12

The Earliest Christian Church

AMMAN – Lying underneath Saint Georgeous Church in Rihab, Mafraq, is what archaeologists describe as the first Christian church in the world.

“We have uncovered what we believe to be the first church in the world, dating from 33AD to 70AD,” said Archaeologist Abdul Qader Hussan, head of the Rihab Centre for Archaeological Studies.

The discovery was “amazing”, Hussan told The Jordan Times.

“We have evidence to believe this church sheltered the early Christians: the 70 disciples of Jesus Christ,” the scholar said.

The early Christians, described in the mosaic inscription on St. Georgeous floor as “the 70 beloved by God and Divine”, are said to have fled from Jerusalem during the persecution of Christians, to the northern part of Jordan, particularly to Rihab, he added.

Citing historical sources, the expert said the 70 lived and practised their rituals in secrecy in this underground church.

We believe that they did not leave the cave and lived until the Christian religion was embraced by Roman rulers.

“It was then when St. Georgeous was built,” said Hussan.

READ MORE HERE